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Inside Pitch vs Outside Pitch

Opinions vary but there are only two types of pitches, inside and outside. When I explore “the pitch” I look deep inside the brain for answers regarding its origin and composition. I look for specific components and principles that regulate the flow of information inside the hitter’s brain. That is what I call an inside pitch. An outside pitch is one that is part of the physical environment and existing outside the brain. To gain a better understand what is actually taking place during a particular pitch we must use the principles of neuroscience as our guide. Coaches that look inside the brain for answers understand the neurological landscape is very complex and gains in performance are difficult to measure. Their quest to train the brain implicitly is fundamental to challenging the status quo ideology of explicit training.

In all honesty, a vast majority of coaches have never seen an “inside pitch”, one that emerges from an invisible electrical field. Their entire reality is based in perception. With all of the new age video equipment and wires and sensors reinforcing their exterior presumptions about timing and pitch selection it’s easy to see why they train explicitly. For example, if a coach sees a hitter making adjustments to a pitch, mid-flight, they believe that the hitter is actually cognitively making those adjustments in real time and that is false. Nevertheless, they will tell a hitter to change something or ask them to do a specific “drill” that will assist them in making faster decisions according to cognitive science.

I was twelve years old when a wise man by the name of Bill Kitts told me, “Believe nothing you hear and only half of what you see”. I didn’t understand the statement at the time but I do now. Ironically, 100% of what you see is misleading and 99% of what I hear in baseball and softball circles regarding hitting is false and can’t be defended by science. Our brains are playing tricks on us and we are letting them. Nevertheless, by looking inside the brain for answers to these perplexing (inside, outside) issues we can lay a solid foundation for future generations to build upon.

The human brain is a unique organ. It is the only organ that is "aware" of itself and its surrounding. Answering baseball questions from a brain based perspective is quite challenging. A couple of fundamental question that I want to look at are; How large is a baseball inside the hitters brain and does "space" have and hold the same properties inside the brain as it does outside the brain?

Scientists have proven that the perceived world and actual world inside the brain differ dramatically. For instance, on the outside of the brain in the physical environment the ball is made of leather and thread but on the inside it is converted into an electrical impulse. It also weighs 5 oz. in the physical environment but it has no measurable weight inside the brain. One theoretical physicist that I work with estimates the size of the ball to be about the size of a grain of sand or smaller since the ball is a mere electrical "bit" of information passing through neurological space.

To me, neurological space is the most mysterious place on earth. This is because the conversion of spatial information for immersion into reality seems to be at a 1:1 ratio. This means that space inside the brain and outside the brain hold the same exact properties. This isn’t true for visible objects like baseballs and softballs. Understanding the properties of space is the key to building implicit systems that impact timing and strike recognition. Neurons regulating spatial information are directly tied to timing & strike recognition through the anatomy of space (electromagnetic field) and the brains entanglement with it.

Outsiders; coaches and instructors that train from a subjective perceptual view point are at every level of the game. It’s a very common practice but it isn’t practical since the anatomy of space contradicts their perceptual reality. Respectfully, it’s all they’ve ever known and it might be all they ever know.

Inside Pitch vs Outside Pitch

Opinions vary but there are only two types of pitches, inside and outside. When I explore “the pitch” I look deep inside the brain for answers regarding its origin and composition. I look for specific components and principles that regulate the flow of information inside the hitter’s brain. That is what I call an inside pitch. An outside pitch is one that is part of the physical environment and existing outside the brain. To gain a better understand what is actually taking place during a particular pitch we must use the principles of neuroscience as our guide. Coaches that look inside the brain for answers understand the neurological landscape is very complex and gains in performance are difficult to measure. Their quest to train the brain implicitly is fundamental to challenging the status quo ideology of explicit training.

In all honesty, a vast majority of coaches have never seen an “inside pitch”, one that emerges from an invisible electrical field. Their entire reality is based in perception. With all of the new age video equipment and wires and sensors reinforcing their exterior presumptions about timing and pitch selection it’s easy to see why they train explicitly. For example, if a coach sees a hitter making adjustments to a pitch, mid-flight, they believe that the hitter is actually cognitively making those adjustments in real time and that is false. Nevertheless, they will tell a hitter to change something or ask them to do a specific “drill” that will assist them in making faster decisions according to cognitive science.

I was twelve years old when a wise man by the name of Bill Kitts told me, “Believe nothing you hear and only half of what you see”. I didn’t understand the statement at the time but I do now. Ironically, 100% of what you see is misleading and 99% of what I hear in baseball and softball circles regarding hitting is false and can’t be defended by science. Our brains are playing tricks on us and we are letting them. Nevertheless, by looking inside the brain for answers to these perplexing (inside, outside) issues we can lay a solid foundation for future generations to build upon.

The human brain is a unique organ. It is the only organ that is "aware" of itself and its surrounding. Answering baseball questions from a brain based perspective is quite challenging. A couple of fundamental question that I want to look at are; How large is a baseball inside the hitters brain and does "space" have and hold the same properties inside the brain as it does outside the brain?

Scientists have proven that the perceived world and actual world inside the brain differ dramatically. For instance, on the outside of the brain in the physical environment the ball is made of leather and thread but on the inside it is converted into an electrical impulse. It also weighs 5 oz. in the physical environment but it has no measurable weight inside the brain. One theoretical physicist that I work with estimates the size of the ball to be about the size of a grain of sand or smaller since the ball is a mere electrical "bit" of information passing through neurological space.

To me, neurological space is the most mysterious place on earth. This is because the conversion of spatial information for immersion into reality seems to be at a 1:1 ratio. This means that space inside the brain and outside the brain hold the same exact properties. This isn’t true for visible objects like baseballs and softballs. Understanding the properties of space is the key to building implicit systems that impact timing and strike recognition. Neurons regulating spatial information are directly tied to timing & strike recognition through the anatomy of space (electromagnetic field) and the brains entanglement with it.

Outsiders; coaches and instructors that train from a subjective perceptual view point are at every level of the game. It’s a very common practice but it isn’t practical since the anatomy of space contradicts their perceptual reality. Respectfully, it’s all they’ve ever known and it might be all they ever know.