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The Illusion of Specialization

This past weekend I saw several tweet threads pertaining to Latin American baseball players and why they are so successful. The arguments centered around external environmental factors such as longer playing seasons, warmer weather, more practice time and a dedication to being baseball specific. Some argued that players in the Dominican Republic, Venezuela and Puerto Rico take 3X the amount of ground balls and BP swings than that of the American youth. This is a partial truth and not an absolute truth. Because there are no studies regarding the true differences between American and Latin American players, it's best if we keep our assumptions confined to established scientific principles.

The baseball world doesn't normally look to biology for offensive output answers but building a case for why Latin American baseball players might be superior to American born players, a quick dive into biology is capable of providing a solid baseline from which to form a valid testable hypothesis. The angle of the sun near the equator is a major contributing factor to how the brain processes light, and therefore spatial information. Baseball players in Latin America are actually/naturally in an enriched light environment.

Human brains are likely affected by the consistent angle of light much like other life forms near the equator. For example, there is more botanical and aquatic life there. It's not because people near the equator plant more trees or fish less than we do, its because of scientific principles of light and biology. Humans are biological units that adhere to the exact same laws governing biological growth.

Biology is super consistent and is a trusted science. My personal assumptions are based upon how the human brain develops in regions where the angle of the sun varies very little. This concentration of light helps the brain develop faster and gives rise to neuro-nets that capture and process spatial data more efficiently. The clues associated with spatial processing and depth perception, such as shadows and shade, are different from those in North America. They are greater in angle and length.( Reference Photo)  This fundamental difference requires longer processing times. It's really pretty simple if we approach it from a scientific angle.

The illusion of "Specialization" is there because we perceive it to be. The observable markers that help coaches form subjective hypothesis and draw conclusions are laced with bias.  In the end, those subjective interpretations of the observable environment lead most down a false positive path. I suggest looking under a microscope at the variations of the brains playing the game. I'm certain we will find some surprises. 

       

The Illusion of Specialization

This past weekend I saw several tweet threads pertaining to Latin American baseball players and why they are so successful. The arguments centered around external environmental factors such as longer playing seasons, warmer weather, more practice time and a dedication to being baseball specific. Some argued that players in the Dominican Republic, Venezuela and Puerto Rico take 3X the amount of ground balls and BP swings than that of the American youth. This is a partial truth and not an absolute truth. Because there are no studies regarding the true differences between American and Latin American players, it's best if we keep our assumptions confined to established scientific principles.

The baseball world doesn't normally look to biology for offensive output answers but building a case for why Latin American baseball players might be superior to American born players, a quick dive into biology is capable of providing a solid baseline from which to form a valid testable hypothesis. The angle of the sun near the equator is a major contributing factor to how the brain processes light, and therefore spatial information. Baseball players in Latin America are actually/naturally in an enriched light environment.

Human brains are likely affected by the consistent angle of light much like other life forms near the equator. For example, there is more botanical and aquatic life there. It's not because people near the equator plant more trees or fish less than we do, its because of scientific principles of light and biology. Humans are biological units that adhere to the exact same laws governing biological growth.

Biology is super consistent and is a trusted science. My personal assumptions are based upon how the human brain develops in regions where the angle of the sun varies very little. This concentration of light helps the brain develop faster and gives rise to neuro-nets that capture and process spatial data more efficiently. The clues associated with spatial processing and depth perception, such as shadows and shade, are different from those in North America. They are greater in angle and length.( Reference Photo)  This fundamental difference requires longer processing times. It's really pretty simple if we approach it from a scientific angle.

The illusion of "Specialization" is there because we perceive it to be. The observable markers that help coaches form subjective hypothesis and draw conclusions are laced with bias.  In the end, those subjective interpretations of the observable environment lead most down a false positive path. I suggest looking under a microscope at the variations of the brains playing the game. I'm certain we will find some surprises.