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The Shift: Why Scott Boras May Be Right

A recent tweet by Scott Boras regarding the unfairness of "the shift" has drawn some criticism and caused a little controversy throughout the baseball community. Whether you agree or disagree with his arguments and observations the fact remains that the issue needs to be addressed from a scientific perspective. Everyone has a personal opinion on the subject but biased opinions seldom lead anywhere. It’s been reasonably hard to find people that believe the shift is a questionable practice but when I examine the elementary components governing the totality of the situation it is something that requires some attention.

I don't plan on going too deep into the matter but I do want present a valid argument that can be used to extend the conversation in a direction that I believe it should go. By using neuro science findings that already exist we can easily establish a valid premise that hitters are at a distinct disadvantage when it comes to making game speed adjustments. Several recent research projects have established “concrete” electrical impulse speeds related to human thought. These studies demonstrated that thoughts weren’t processed fast enough to allow for conscious adjustments by hitters while the ball is in flight.

V-Flex Sports adamantly rejects the popular belief that hitters can simply walk up to the plate and place the ball anywhere they want to against a MLB level pitcher. The interference patterns produced within the hitters’ electromagnetic field of view upon the release of the pitch are governed by the laws of biology and physics and not the hitters mind or its perceptual reality. Hitters actually have little or no cognitive control over the (stimuli / response) variables that are being used to transmit the electrical information that the brain is processing as the pitcher releases the ball. Therefore, hitters can’t cognitively defend themselves against “the shift”.  Therefore, it is only a matter of time until some type of proposal will address the issue. 

Hitting instructors at every level of the game use a variety of video analysis systems which can easily show adjustments being made by hitters while the ball is in flight. Therefore, they argue that elite hitters can make real time adjustments via physical feedback. Unfortunately, there are a couple of major flaws with that premise. The primary one centers on the superconductive nature of light and the non-superconductive nature of the human body. These basic physical disparities establish a mathematical certainty that proves the physical adjustments that hitting instructors are watching via the rewind button occur prior to the release of the ball and are simulated augmentation expressions of how the brain converted bits of emerging data and built the mind an emergent spatial reality through which we “experience” hitting a baseball. Grasping how this can be possible requires a greater understanding of entanglement theory and how light reacts inside the brain.

The electrical conversions taking place at the cellular level establish an absolute synaptic delay prior to any physical locomotion. This neuro-physical delay when processed in conjunction with a cognitive thought loop takes approximately ¾ or .75 of a sec. As a simple point of reference, let’s look at a ball traveling at 60 mph. A ball traveling at 60mph will travel 66 feet in 3/4 of a second. This means, that the hitters brain can’t possibly use a cognitive loop to initiate a series of locomotion’s for hitting a 95 mph fast ball if it wants to be on time. To further understand how it’s not possible for the hitter to utilize his consciousness during the pitch let’s take an example that happens to automobile drivers on a daily basis. A driver has a car stop short in front of them forcing them to “react” very quickly to avoid a collision. The movement of the foot from the gas to the brake, the pressure applied to the brake, and any necessary turning of the wheel are all done in the form of a full body reflex. The brain, being a supernatural processor, can compute all of the necessary movements and forces that need to be applied to give the best chance at avoiding a car crash. It would be impossible for the driver to consciously (cognitively) try to make the necessary adjustments to avoid the crash. The same goes for the hitter with the ball is thrown. It is simply not possible for them to (cognitively) manipulate the result.

Another basic piece of evidence that shows hitters aren’t in cognitive control of their hitting outcomes is the current strike out ratios. It’s no struggle for everyone to admit that strikeouts are at an all-time high and rising. As a matter of fact, it’s entirely possible that there will be more k’s than hits this season. This is truly a serious issue that is crippling the game and tells me that hitters are struggling to merely hit the ball and it’s irresponsible to think they can hit it where they want, when they can’t even put the bat on the ball on a regular basis.

Based on the information we have, we know that neurological tendencies exist and that they are unique to each individual, some being more prone to tendencies than others. Those tendencies are too easily exploited and it’s time for the MLB to offer some common sense solutions before “the shift” gets out of hand. The NBA banned the “Zone” defense for a reason and it may be time for baseball experts to address “the shift” (zone defense) in the MLB.

The Shift: Why Scott Boras May Be Right

A recent tweet by Scott Boras regarding the unfairness of "the shift" has drawn some criticism and caused a little controversy throughout the baseball community. Whether you agree or disagree with his arguments and observations the fact remains that the issue needs to be addressed from a scientific perspective. Everyone has a personal opinion on the subject but biased opinions seldom lead anywhere. It’s been reasonably hard to find people that believe the shift is a questionable practice but when I examine the elementary components governing the totality of the situation it is something that requires some attention.

I don't plan on going too deep into the matter but I do want present a valid argument that can be used to extend the conversation in a direction that I believe it should go. By using neuro science findings that already exist we can easily establish a valid premise that hitters are at a distinct disadvantage when it comes to making game speed adjustments. Several recent research projects have established “concrete” electrical impulse speeds related to human thought. These studies demonstrated that thoughts weren’t processed fast enough to allow for conscious adjustments by hitters while the ball is in flight.

V-Flex Sports adamantly rejects the popular belief that hitters can simply walk up to the plate and place the ball anywhere they want to against a MLB level pitcher. The interference patterns produced within the hitters’ electromagnetic field of view upon the release of the pitch are governed by the laws of biology and physics and not the hitters mind or its perceptual reality. Hitters actually have little or no cognitive control over the (stimuli / response) variables that are being used to transmit the electrical information that the brain is processing as the pitcher releases the ball. Therefore, hitters can’t cognitively defend themselves against “the shift”.  Therefore, it is only a matter of time until some type of proposal will address the issue. 

Hitting instructors at every level of the game use a variety of video analysis systems which can easily show adjustments being made by hitters while the ball is in flight. Therefore, they argue that elite hitters can make real time adjustments via physical feedback. Unfortunately, there are a couple of major flaws with that premise. The primary one centers on the superconductive nature of light and the non-superconductive nature of the human body. These basic physical disparities establish a mathematical certainty that proves the physical adjustments that hitting instructors are watching via the rewind button occur prior to the release of the ball and are simulated augmentation expressions of how the brain converted bits of emerging data and built the mind an emergent spatial reality through which we “experience” hitting a baseball. Grasping how this can be possible requires a greater understanding of entanglement theory and how light reacts inside the brain.

The electrical conversions taking place at the cellular level establish an absolute synaptic delay prior to any physical locomotion. This neuro-physical delay when processed in conjunction with a cognitive thought loop takes approximately ¾ or .75 of a sec. As a simple point of reference, let’s look at a ball traveling at 60 mph. A ball traveling at 60mph will travel 66 feet in 3/4 of a second. This means, that the hitters brain can’t possibly use a cognitive loop to initiate a series of locomotion’s for hitting a 95 mph fast ball if it wants to be on time. To further understand how it’s not possible for the hitter to utilize his consciousness during the pitch let’s take an example that happens to automobile drivers on a daily basis. A driver has a car stop short in front of them forcing them to “react” very quickly to avoid a collision. The movement of the foot from the gas to the brake, the pressure applied to the brake, and any necessary turning of the wheel are all done in the form of a full body reflex. The brain, being a supernatural processor, can compute all of the necessary movements and forces that need to be applied to give the best chance at avoiding a car crash. It would be impossible for the driver to consciously (cognitively) try to make the necessary adjustments to avoid the crash. The same goes for the hitter with the ball is thrown. It is simply not possible for them to (cognitively) manipulate the result.

Another basic piece of evidence that shows hitters aren’t in cognitive control of their hitting outcomes is the current strike out ratios. It’s no struggle for everyone to admit that strikeouts are at an all-time high and rising. As a matter of fact, it’s entirely possible that there will be more k’s than hits this season. This is truly a serious issue that is crippling the game and tells me that hitters are struggling to merely hit the ball and it’s irresponsible to think they can hit it where they want, when they can’t even put the bat on the ball on a regular basis.

Based on the information we have, we know that neurological tendencies exist and that they are unique to each individual, some being more prone to tendencies than others. Those tendencies are too easily exploited and it’s time for the MLB to offer some common sense solutions before “the shift” gets out of hand. The NBA banned the “Zone” defense for a reason and it may be time for baseball experts to address “the shift” (zone defense) in the MLB.