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Timing as Pre-Motor Function

The brain needs a specific type of information if it is going to process spatial information faster. The origin of the information is what guides the brain in it's search for a path of least resistance within the EM (electromagnetic) field.  It can respond more precisely to incoming data if it is primed with a continual flow of emerging information.  Condensed instant information is needed  for the hitters brain to develop a precise understanding of the strike zone. 

Instant visual information and instant physical feedback are two totally different things. An entire electronic industry has developed around feedback and the quest to shorten certain feedback loops for hitters. Regretfully, there are misguided understandings of what types of information the hitters brain is using to generate a swing at a strike.  Those misguided assumptions led to some very unscientific tools and approaches regarding pitch recognition and timing over the years.  It seems to be never ending, with new companies attaching sensors on the hitters body and bat, as well as video analysis systems that provide the hitter more "feedback" than ever. The biggest problem with physical feedback is, it isn't traveling through a superconductor. Its traveling through a human body that is filled with imperfections. 

Providing the hitter with instant visual information is possible because of the superconductive nature of light.  Recruiting or fully activating the spatial neurons within the hitters receptive field is the cornerstone to implicit training.  Prepping the visual system for optimal ocular / motor functions requires a shift from traditional training methods. Some guys are ready to make the shift and some aren't.  

Principles that govern the strike zone and timing will be discussed at the Expo Forum on Friday the 5th at the ABCA convention in Indy. Integration and transfer-ability are key topic questions. Discussing them as a pre-motor function will challenge status quo assumptions and elicit conversations. Big thank you to Dr. Peter Fadde, founder of gameSense, for inviting me to be on the discussion panel. Others include Jason Sherwin at deCervo and Joe Bingold from Senaptec. All of these technologies focus on the timing aspect of hitting. Each of us will have 5 min to showcase our products and the finale involves a 20 minute Q&A segment. This is going to be an exceptional experience. Visit V-Flex Booth#1538 to pick up one of our 2018 brochures.

We closed out our first day at the ABCA with a PO from the Milwaukee Brewers organization. Can't wait to see what tomorrow holds.    

Timing as Pre-Motor Function

The brain needs a specific type of information if it is going to process spatial information faster. The origin of the information is what guides the brain in it's search for a path of least resistance within the EM (electromagnetic) field.  It can respond more precisely to incoming data if it is primed with a continual flow of emerging information.  Condensed instant information is needed  for the hitters brain to develop a precise understanding of the strike zone. 

Instant visual information and instant physical feedback are two totally different things. An entire electronic industry has developed around feedback and the quest to shorten certain feedback loops for hitters. Regretfully, there are misguided understandings of what types of information the hitters brain is using to generate a swing at a strike.  Those misguided assumptions led to some very unscientific tools and approaches regarding pitch recognition and timing over the years.  It seems to be never ending, with new companies attaching sensors on the hitters body and bat, as well as video analysis systems that provide the hitter more "feedback" than ever. The biggest problem with physical feedback is, it isn't traveling through a superconductor. Its traveling through a human body that is filled with imperfections. 

Providing the hitter with instant visual information is possible because of the superconductive nature of light.  Recruiting or fully activating the spatial neurons within the hitters receptive field is the cornerstone to implicit training.  Prepping the visual system for optimal ocular / motor functions requires a shift from traditional training methods. Some guys are ready to make the shift and some aren't.  

Principles that govern the strike zone and timing will be discussed at the Expo Forum on Friday the 5th at the ABCA convention in Indy. Integration and transfer-ability are key topic questions. Discussing them as a pre-motor function will challenge status quo assumptions and elicit conversations. Big thank you to Dr. Peter Fadde, founder of gameSense, for inviting me to be on the discussion panel. Others include Jason Sherwin at deCervo and Joe Bingold from Senaptec. All of these technologies focus on the timing aspect of hitting. Each of us will have 5 min to showcase our products and the finale involves a 20 minute Q&A segment. This is going to be an exceptional experience. Visit V-Flex Booth#1538 to pick up one of our 2018 brochures.

We closed out our first day at the ABCA with a PO from the Milwaukee Brewers organization. Can't wait to see what tomorrow holds.